The Honeytones / Ben Pirani and the Means of Production

The Honeytones / Ben Pirani and the Means of Production

Fri · March 15, 2019

8:00 pm

$10.00

The Honeytones
The Honeytones
The Honeytones are a soul band from the funky rust belt town of Akron, OH. Although he’s only been on the scene for several years, Wesley has grown to be a regional favorite amongst true soul-lovers and vinyl collectors. As a vocalist, he is quoted to be a honey-voiced frontman who’s got the pipes and the moves to keep the crowd going all night! Backed by the Honeytones, Wesley is stepping out on his own to create a new soul sound that bridges the gap between classic soul and the modern sound. Being compared to greats like Al Green and Otis Redding, there is something really show stopping about him. His way of getting the whole crowd to sing and dance together has earned him the reputation of a true dynamo on stage!
Ben Pirani
Ben Pirani
Soul music is many things to Ben Pirani: It’s positive and it’s hopeful. It’s a soundtrack for struggle, which is where soul music came from in the first place. That the struggle has been happening largely in the black community is not lost on Pirani, who is white — it’s something he thinks about a lot. “I feel really strongly that soul music is precious and must be treated with care and respect,” he says. “Anything less is colonizing the funk.” That brings us to another crucial point: real soul can’t be faked — it’s an expression of self that is so much more than mimicry of the sounds that have come before. “It’s called soul music,” Pirani says. “You’re supposed to sing from your heart and your soul and not your record collection.”
That’s exactly what he does on How Do I Talk to My Brother? Make no mistake: Pirani has a lock on the sound and feel of soul music on his Colemine Records debut. The album contains 11 deeply felt tracks with echos of vintage soul in the vocal harmonies, the way the songs sit back in a deep pocket and Pirani’s unerring instinct for stick-inyour- head hooks. Yet he isn’t just rummaging around in the past on How Do I Talk to My Brother? The New York-via-Chicago singer, songwriter and multi- instrumentalist brings a contemporary context to his music: He’s writing about what he sees going on all around him, and his reaction to it, be it racism, love, war, poverty or politics.
Venue Information:
Mahall's
13200 Madison Ave.
Lakewood, OH, 44107
http://www.mahalls20lanes.com/